Maite Gomez-Rejón in her home kitchen making sufganiyot

Maite Gomez-Rejón, courtesy of the instructor

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Cooking with ArtBites

Hanukkah and the Jelly Doughnut | Online

Sunday, December 5, 10:00–11:00 am (PT)

About the Program

Have you ever wondered why jelly doughnuts, or sufganiyot, are eaten during Hanukkah? If so, you’re in luck! During this family-friendly online workshop, join Maite Gomez-Rejón of ArtBites to hear the history of this rich holiday treat and make a simple and delicious version from the comfort of your home kitchen.

To cook along, participants should be prepared with the ingredients and equipment listed below.

Ingredients list: 

  • 1 Roll buttermilk biscuit dough, at room temperature 
  • Vegetable oil, for frying 
  • ¾ Cup powdered sugar 
  • ½ Cup smooth jelly or jam of choice

Equipment needed: 

  • Cutting board, knife, dutch oven or medium pot, tongs, paper towels, squeeze bottle, mesh strainer
  • ​Candy or deep-frying thermometer (optional)
     

“Each time I go to one of [Maite’s] events, I leave it exhilarated, inspired, and sated.”—ArtBites student


Instructor: Maite Gomez-Rejón is the founder of ArtBites. She has dedicated her career to exploring the nexus of art and culinary history through lectures, cooking classes, and tastings presented in museums and universities across the country and through videos on her YouTube channel—ArtBites: Cooking Art History. Gomez-Rejón has a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin, an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a Grande Diplome from the French Culinary Institute in New York City. She has been a guest on the Today Show, featured in Food & Wine magazine and Hyperallergic, and interviewed on KCRW's Good Food, NPR's Splendid Table, and the BBC’s The Food Programme. She is also a contributor to Life & Thyme, Eaten Magazine, Gastro Obscura, and other publications. Her essay, “Mexico's Early Cookbooks,” appears in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History.