Enjoy thought-provoking readings, conversations, panel discussions, and spoken word programs. Also check out virtual talks now streaming on the Skirball’s YouTube channel.
  • Kristof and WuDunn Talk

    An Evening with Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

    Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope | Virtual Talk

    Tuesday, January 26, 6:00 pm (PT)

    FREE online program

    Journey across twenty-first-century America with Pulitzer Prize–winning authors Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, whose book Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope serves as inspiration for the Skirball’s online exhibition. In a discussion and Q&A moderated by Eric Liu, Co-Founder and CEO of Citizen University, Kristof and WuDunn provide a compassionate look at the many challenges facing the American public and offer ideas for how we might forge a new path forward.

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  • Cartooning through Chaos

    Cartooning Through Chaos

    Virtual Talk

    Thursday, February 11, 7:30 pm (PT)

    FREE online program

    Lampooning social and political ills, cartoonists have educated and entertained us in a year that’s been anything but fun. Join us for a lively discussion with three award-winning, LA-based cartoonists: Lalo Alcaraz (La Cucaracha), Darrin Bell (Candorville), and David Glenn Brown (Los Angeles Sentinel).

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  • Ai Weiwei

    A Conversation with Ai Weiwei

    Virtual Talk

    Premiering on YouTube | Sunday, February 21, 11:00 am (PT)

    FREE | Reservations recommended

    In this rare speaking engagement, hear from celebrated visual artist, filmmaker, and political activist Ai Weiwei as he explores his vast body of work in the context of social justice. Imprisoned by Chinese authorities in 2011 without cause, Ai has dedicated his life and career to speaking out against human-rights violations around the globe. In this virtual conversation with Skirball curator Yael Lipschutz, Ai discusses how he views the interconnectivity of human suffering as stemming from cultural and economic systems that value profit rather than human life. Yet Ai Weiwei, in his own words, reminds us that although the world's problems are deep and complex, “we hope for the better.”

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